When I spoke at the Maryland Career Development Association annual conference last month, I enjoyed a keynote address from the president of the National Career Development Association, Sharon Givens. Among other fascinating trends and facts, she shared these about automation:

  • 47% of US employment is at high risk of automation in the next decade or two (Oxford Martin School)
  • Roughly 50% of work activities are automatable using current technology (McKinsey Global Institute)
  • In 2022 AI will eliminate 75 million jobs (World Economic Forum)
  • Over the next few decades approximately 25% of US employment will have experienced high exposure to automation (Brookings Institute)

Then the coolest thing was her introducing a website where you could look up your job to see the chances of a robot taking your job!

To see the future of your job click below to go to:

Will Robots Take My Job?

You can also see lists of jobs at high risk, low risk and a “hot jobs” list of low risk, high growth, high wage jobs.

Here is a diverse sample of jobs at low risk from the top 50:

  • Occupational Therapists
  • Neuropsychologists
  • Special Education Teachers
  • Photographers
  • Supervisors of Firefighters
  • Fitness and Wellness
  • Lodging Managers
  • Security Managers
  • Conservation Scientists
  • Clergy

(Plus many health care and teaching jobs.)

Here is a diverse sample of jobs at high risk from the top 50:

  • Food Science Technicians
  • Tax Preparers
  • Manicurists
  • Real Estate Brokers
  • Legal Secretaries
  • Insurance Claims Clerks
  • Umpires and Referees
  • Credit Analysts
  • Cytotechnologists
  • Models

Check out this Forbes Article for tips from embracing AI to becoming highly emotionally intelligent:

WORRIED ABOUT AI TAKING OVER? HERE ARE 13 WAYS TO PROTECT YOUR JOB

W

I was thrilled to be the sole expert interviewed for an article by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for their March 20, 2022 Spring Education Guide. Reporter Vanessa Orr wrote the extensive piece, Career Counseling Can Help Students Make Grounded Choices. I hope you can share the article (below and linked) with parents of any high school students. I offer a short four-session High School Advising Package to help with choices for education paths at all levels, including apprenticeships as well as the gap year choice. Sophomore year is the ideal time.

March 20, 2022

Imagine spending thousands of dollars on a college education and then realizing that the career field you majored in wasn’t really what you wanted to do. It happens all the time, and not only is it a waste of money to pursue the wrong degree, but if you have to go back to school, it can cost you a lot more time in the long run.

Finding out a student’s interests, as well as what they’re good at, is one of the goals of career coaching.

“Students and parents are often so focused on choosing a college and picking a major that they’re not always looking at the big picture,” explains Karen Litzinger, MA, LPC, of Litzinger Career Consulting. “Are they making a grounded choice, and what careers connect to it?

“Rarely do high school students undergo a comprehensive personalized career assessment, which involves first looking at yourself in terms of four things—interests, skills, values and personality,” she continues. “The other half is exploring what’s out there in terms of majors and careers.”

Considering that the U.S. Department of Education reports that roughly one-third of students in bachelor’s degree programs and 28 percent of those in associate’s degree programs change majors within three years of enrolling, it’s important that students have a good handle on what they want out of an education. About 1 in 10 students change majors more than once.

“This is an indication that students are not making the best or most grounded decisions,” says Litzinger. “Ideally, they should network with people in a few fields of interest or job shadow or volunteer to test out a career before making that decision.

This is especially important when considering how much it costs to go to college.

“People graduate with tens of thousands of dollars in debt—it’s a national crisis and it definitely limits what one can do in terms of career choices,” says Litzinger. “This type of debt also impacts things like the ability to buy a house or to get married.”

Litzinger advises the students that she coaches to be open to a wide range of options.

“For decades, people viewed college as the only ticket to success, but now society is starting to realize that there are high-paying, highly skilled jobs that can be very rewarding in the trades,” she says. “I always bring that up as part of the landscape because a bachelor’s degree isn’t for everybody.”

While some parents may feel the need to pressure students to make a decision, this may not be the right approach.  

“Parents are just trying to help their sons or daughters as much as possible, and they are naturally concerned about their child’s future security,” says Litzinger. “But what works best is when a parent tries to really facilitate the process by recognizing the individuality of that child rather than their own views or experiences.

“Even well-meaning parents may find that they can run into emotional conflicts during this time, which is why they will often call a college or career counselor,” she adds.

While counseling is available in most schools, the reality is that the student-to-counselor ratio is very high, making it almost impossible for students to receive individualized help.

“With so many other things to do, including discipline and scheduling, school counselor may focus more on students just getting into college rather than clarifying goals, or asking how and why a student chose something,” said Litzinger.

“The goal is to not have them narrow their choices to one; whether looking at colleges or trade schools, they should always have at least two education angles in mind,” said Litzinger.

She emphasized the importance of working with students to determine their interests, skills, values and personality, and having them take part in career-researching assignments.

“This is a bigger decision than most people realize,” she added, noting that 63 percent of students seeking a bachelor’s degree now graduate within six years instead of four. “It’s important to invest in what needs to be done to make a grounded decision.”

“What did you do during your summer vacation” has been replaced by “How are you managing during the pandemic?” It’s hard to believe summer is about over. It flew by for me being busier than ever with so many people re-evaluating their jobs and seeking greater happiness: pandemic perspective-taking.

The photo featured is the “coffee shop” wall I created in one of my rooms where I could write my book since the coffee shop where I did most of my writing was closed.  What did you create? What did you learn? What do you want to do differently in your life due to the pandemic?  I invite you to take time to reflect.

Job seekers will need to answer the new interview questions: “How did you spend your time during the pandemic?” and “What did you learn during the pandemic.” I’d like to share some strategies on that as well as a couple links to remote working and “the great resignation”, two topics I was interviewed about by KDKA radio during the summer.

Remote Working: The work landscape has changed forever. Interestingly workers have different needs.  In the Microsoft 2021 Work Trend Index, 73% of employees want remote work options to stay, and 67% of employees want more in-person work or collaboration. Hybrid it is!

The Great Resignation: What has also been referred to as the Turnover Tsunami is underway. Early research was done by Prudential Financial which found that 26% of workers planned to start interviewing once the pandemic subsided, higher for Gen X’ers at 34%.Of the job changers, 72% said the pandemic caused them to rethink their skill sets. A later Microsoft survey found that 41% of workers globally were planning to quit their job. CLICK HERE for a nice summary of trends.

The New Interview Questions: Even though employers may be more forgiving of long-term unemployment during the pandemic, others will wonder if you just decided to enjoy the summer due to added government benefits.  It’s not too late to take some action to have an answer to the question, “What did you do during the pandemic?”  In addition to mentioning specific health concerns or caretaking responsibilities, it is legitimate to say: “I decided to take some time to re-evaluate my career choice including career counseling/career research/networking/volunteering, and it helped me to clarify my goal of ______________  which is why I’m so pleased to be interviewing with you today.”  Better yet, “During the pandemic, I decided to use some time to build my skills, including taking on-line courses in ____ and ____. Doing so confirmed my career interest in _____ and I know these new skills will be an asset to your company. 

For free on-line courses, CLICK HERE.

There is still time to do something that you can use for this interview answer!  Plus now is still a good time for career counseling to re-evaluate and gain greater happiness.

LinkedIn Analysis of Green Job Posting in 2020Growth
  
Traditional green jobs 
Energy Analyst88%
Transportation Engineer47%
Facilities Operations Manager31%
Geologist19%
Health Safety Environmental Supervisor10%
  
Nontraditional green jobs 
Customer Service Representative71%
Sales Representative62%
Warehouse Specialist45%
Compliance Manager31%
Quality Inspector16%
Chart data source: George Anders Workforce Insights Newsletter

The pandemic has caused many to reflect on what is important in life, including work choices.  Perhaps you or someone you know is wondering about how to make a difference in the world.  Green jobs are one path. We’re not talking just science geeks anymore, though Energy Analyst job postings increased a whopping 88% in 2020. Sales Specialists in green industries also had a huge increase, by 62% last year. In recognition of Earth Day month, I’m featuring recent LinkedIn data on green jobs and green skills.  The data is simply a snapshot of what is going on, not outlook predictions.  For this, naturally the US Department of Labor is the go-to source, but it features only traditional green jobs, such as Solar Voltaric Installers growing by 50.5% in the 2019-2029 period.

LinkedIn conducted an analysis of thousands of postings in 2020 related to green-economy skills.   The jobs were classified as either traditional green jobs or non-traditional green jobs. The results showed that there were 2.6 non-traditional green job postings for every traditional green job.

A March 2021 article in GreenBiz featured LinkedIn’s chief Economist, Karin Kimbrough. She shared, “We identified about 800 ‘core’ green skills and more than 300 green-related skills across 12 categories.”  The fastest growing green skills are in ecosystem management, environmental policy and sustainable procurement.

Some examples cited of trends in skills growth among less traditional “green” areas include:

  • In environmental finance, sustainable investment is increasingly being reported by investment analysts and portfolio managers.
  • In pollution prevention, knowledge of sustainable fashion is increasingly popular among designers, stylists, and sales staff.

Keep in mind that an increase in self-reporting of green skills may indicate candidate interest as much as job requirements or growth. The most trusted source for job outlook is the U.S. Department of Labor; however, the focus of green job reporting is on traditional science-related jobs.

In the April 21, 2021 Department of Labor blogpost, Green Jobs with the Most Projected Openings, 2019-2029, here are the nine highlighted jobs, four with faster than average growth:

  • Environmental scientists and specialists
  • Chemists
  • Hazardous materials removal workers
  • Environmental science and protection technicians
  • Environmental Engineers
  • Geoscientists
  • Biochemists and biophysicists
  • Solar photovoltaic installers
  • Conservation Scientists

Click here to link to the article which contains salary and outlook information as well as links to career descriptions.

Click here for a link I like that includes a few sustainability careers without technical requirements, including:

  • Ecotourism Guide
  • Environmental Public Relations Specialist
  • Zoning Technician

There are green job opportunities at all education and income levels. Remember that besides outlook, grounded career decision-making also includes looking at interests, skills, values and personality traits.  Career counseling can help a person explore and sort through the wide range of options to make a difference in the greening world!

Photo by permission of Pexels by Arthur Ogleznev – 1296265

LinkedIn published a special Jobs on the Rise report in January 2021 analyzing job listings between April and October 2020 since the economy has changed so much due to the pandemic. LinkedIn tracked the growth in listings for over 15,000 job titles to identify the ones that increased the most in 2020 compared with 2019. The titles were then grouped into 15 major career areas.

  • Fulfillment/E-Commerce
  • Loans & Mortgages
  • Healthcare Support
  • Business Development/Sales
  • Workplace Diversity
  • Digital Marketing
  • Nursing
  • Education
  • Digital Content
  • Personal and Professional Coaching
  • Software
  • Mental Health
  • User Experience
  • Data Science
  • Artificial Intelligence

The data includes related job titles, outlook, earnings and likelihood of remote options.

CLICK HERE for summary article.

Click here for full report.

Image courtesy of Wikipedia

“Today we acknowledge the shadows, but we lean into the light.” This quote by Carrie Newcomer from Saturday’s Daily Good newsletter spoke to me in the aftermath of the traumatic events of January 6. Regardless of political leanings, I think her article can be relevant to many. This article spoke to me about hope and on the balance of taking action at the societal and personal levels for healing.

A Speed of Soul Encouragement – Acknowledging Grief, Claiming Love, Remembering Radiance

Carrie Newcomer, Artist/Musician, originally posted in www.DailyGood.org, January 9, 2021


In the wake of January 6th many of us are wrestling with grief, dismay, anger, racial double standard and discouragement. So today I acknowledge what is hard as stone. Lets not candy coat anything. But let us also claim that there is a stronger force, a deeper truth and a wide and active community of good hearted, decent people. Let us remind one another of all the fine and honorable people in our own lives. Let us remind ourselves of how many people got up this morning and continue to make the world a kinder place, one day, one person, three feet around them.

Yesterday I wrote my legislators, and encourage others to claim agency and let their voices be hear. But I also encourage digging into what makes your life good. Howard Thurman wrote that “hope is the remembrance of radiance, the assurance that Light will be Light, even when walking in dark places.” I am gathering to myself that remembrance of radiance, the assurance that even in the aftermath of viewing the forces of shadow close up, goodness is still goodness, Light is still Light, and hope is still here and has not been hemmed in. I wrote my legislators, but I also texted a few dear friends to tell them I care, and to express that I am grateful for their presence in my life and in the world.

My encouragement today is to claim agency and to claim love. Text, zoom, call or somehow connect with someone who you think of as a treasure in your life, someone that illuminates your life, who reminds you of the power of love and the remembrance of radiance. Reach out and affirm what keeps saving us – goodness, kindness, faithfulness, gratitude, generosity, hospitality, justice and love…always love. Lay your hand on your heart and know that you also illuminate the lives of others around you. You are also doing what you can each day, in your own way, to make the world around you a kinder place.

Today we acknowledge the shadows, but we lean into the light.

More about Carrie Newcomer HERE

Image shown is free stock from Pexels by Anas Hinde

In light of the January 6 events and the upcoming inauguration, I am sharing “A Prayer for America” that I believe can speak to most political and spiritual leanings. It is from the 1994 book, Illuminata, by Marianne Williamson.

Dear God,
We join in prayer to celebrate this nation and surrender its destiny to You.
We give thanks for the founding of this country.
We give thanks for and bless the souls of those who came before us to found this nation, to nurture and save it.
We ask that God’s spirit now fill our hearts with righteousness.
May we play our parts in the healing and the furtherance of our country.
May we be cleansed of all destructive thoughts.
May judgment of others, bigotry, racism, and intolerance be washed clean from our hearts.
May our minds be filled with the thoughts of God.
His unconditional love and His acceptance of all people.
May this nation be forgiven its transgressions against the African-American, the Native American, the nation of Vietnam, our men and women who should not have suffered or died or there, and any all others. Please bless their souls.
May we learn from our mistakes, that the people who have died from them shall not have died in vain.
May our lives be turned into instruments of resurrection, that the sins of our fathers might be reversed through us.
May the beauty and the greatness of this land burst furth once more in the hearts of its people.
May the dreams of our forefathers be realized in us, that we might live in honesty and integrity and excellence with our neighbors.
May this country once again become a light unto the nations of hope and goodness and peace and freedom.
May violence and darkness be cast out of our midst.
May hatred no longer find fertile ground in which to grow here.
May all of us feel God’s grace upon us.
Reignite, dear God, the spirit of truth in our hearts.
May our nations be given a new light, the sacred fire that once shone so bright from shore to shore.
May we be repaired.
May we be forgiven.
May our children be blessed.
May we be renewed.
Dear God, please bless America.
Amen. 

1994 from Illuminata by Marianne Williamson

Free image credit: By Harley Pebley – Flickr: Prayer for USA, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32754317

Gone are the office parties and social festive gatherings of yesteryear, at least for this season!  Maybe you’ve already cringed at seeing the word networking in the title? Whether you are in a career transition or not, remember it is always good to stay in touch with friends, family and past colleagues. You may one day want to ask a question like “Do you know anyone in the ___________ field/industry?”

The pandemic is a perfect opportunity to get back in touch with people from the past.  Many people were reaching out in the spring with a “Thinking of you. How are you?” message.  So many of my clients regularly share how they have lost touch with people from long ago and feel awkward about reaching out.  Now is a good time for a holiday greeting of caring and connection.  If you are exploring a career shift or in the midst of the job search, keep it light and relationship-oriented. You can always follow-up in January.

It doesn’t matter that much whether it’s via Facebook, LinkedIn, email, phone call, text or a nice old-fashioned holiday card.

You might share something like:

“I know I’ve not been in touch for quite a while, but the pandemic got me thinking that I wanted to reach out and share a holiday hello.  I hope you and your loved ones are managing well enough during these trying times. (Can share a bit about yourself.) I look forward to hearing how you’re doing and maybe catching up a bit. Best wishes for a safe, healthy and meaningful holiday season.”

Don’t miss this unique time to reach out and touch someone!  Figuratively, of course!

Four years ago on election day, I shared the 1 minute music video of Building Bridges, which seems even more idealistic now than in 2016.

I decided to re-share my idealism as I was reminded today of this inspiration from Abraham Lincoln: “We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection.”

I came across Lincoln’s 1961 First Inaugural Address excerpt on the website of Citizen University.  An election day NPR news story “After Votes Are Counted, What Will It Take to Reconcile the Country?” is what exposed me to Citizen University whose mission is to build a culture of powerful, responsible citizenship. Most interesting on their site is their election night Gathering Guide resource with ideas of how to experience the evening on one’s own or with loved ones, together or apart. It includes music, poetry, and what they call “Civic Scripture” featuring addresses from Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Reagan and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  They also sponsor an annual Civic Saturday  which will be on November 7.

As a business owner and Libra who values harmony, I try to post inspiration that can speak to people of many backgrounds and views with the hope that we can find common ground. Therefore, I want to end with the last two paragraphs of Lincoln’s 1961 Inaugural Address. May it give us hope that through grace and love, we will come through these trying, divisive times.

In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail you. You can have no conflict, without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in Heaven to destroy the government, while I shall have the most solemn one to “preserve, protect and defend” it.

I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battle-field and patriot grave, to every living heart and hearthstone, all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.

Abraham Lincoln, 1861

Perhaps you are needing to reinvent yourself because the pandemic crashed your industry. Or you may be employed, but the pandemic has caused you to think about life, time, and greater happiness. Or you may be insecure in your job and want to have some back-up plans in place if needed.

Whatever the reason, it is important to think through a next step for greater happiness and success in a thoughtful way.  Even if you are unemployed and thinking “I’m open to anything” because you just want food on your table, it is still important to have grounded job targets; employers want candidates who are motivated to work for them. Being clear on goals and job targets will also make you more successful in your search since people can’t help you well with networking unless you are clear about what you want.  Networking is always the best job search method rather than simply getting sucked into the black hole of the Internet. Lastly, the clearer you are, the more likely you will land somewhere that is a good match and you won’t need to go through this all again too soon.

THE JOB MARKET

Before getting into a framework on how to best choose goals and have a successful job search, here’s a bit of information on the everchanging pandemic job market to help motivate you.  We all know the first wave most hit the hospitality, food, retail, and entertainment industries the hardest. There was also some hit to eds and meds, which are expected to continue or increase in the second wave, yes, even hospitals.  Government jobs are expected to be hit badly in the next waves of furloughs and layoffs.  Of the early layoffs, Bloomberg cited that 30% of lost jobs will never come back and University of Chicago predicted 42% not returning.

On the positive side, a June article from Marketplace.org noted the survivors from LinkedIn data which could be helpful in looking toward the future. During the April crash hardware and networking jobs increased by 2.3%, including semiconductor makers, internet service providers, wireless firms, and makers of networking gear. I like to remind people that these industries employ all types of people, including administrative, not just tech folks. Small business hiring went up a bit bringing back workers, while larger companies shed 10,000 workers, paring back by 39.6%. The Pittsburgh Business Times reported gains in Science R&D of 700 jobs in April. Financial services had a 1,000 job growth in April prompting an effort for recruitment with the PA Bankers Association, called BankWorks.

A University of Connecticut report noted current positive trends in jobs related to on-line shopping and mobile marketing.  Among the report’s post-COVID positive trends are Digital, Renewable Energy and Construction.  The Marketplace.org article noted positive longer-term trends for logistics and supply-chain management; automation, including robotics and coding related; and eldercare and home healthcare due to the graying of America.

“Your power to choose the direction in your life allows you to reinvent yourself,

to change your future, and to powerfully influence the rest of creation.”

Stephen Covey

CAREER PLANNING FRAMEWORK

Briefly here are elements to be thinking about when exploring and planning your next steps. Career counseling can help you walk through it with tools, counseling insights, and even career assessments/testing:

Know Yourself

  • Interests – or at least liking tasks so you aren’t miserable when waking up in the morning
  • Skills/Strength – What comes naturally to you, or on the practical end, what can you leverage but not be unhappy? What transferrable skills do you have?
  • Personality – Who are you naturally and how does that fit or not fit a career field, industry or even specific employer culture
  • Values – What is important to you in a job and in life

Explore and Research What’s Out There:

  • Written resources – After connecting self to potential fields of interest, use neutral resources through the Department of Labor like the O*Net to learn and narrow down
  • Networking – Ideally talk to 2-3 people in 2-4 fields to get real world information and advice and check out feasibility in the job market
  • Professional Associations – This can be a source of written information and networking leads
  • Shadowing – Not so possible in pandemic times, but something to keep in mind for the future
  • Volunteering – This could be an opportunity to explore a career, gain experience for your resume and make contacts, even remotely
  • Internship – Similar to volunteering, you may be able to create a more meaningful, structured experience, even if not a current student
  • Coursework – Take a course or two (or training experience) to decide between two fields, test it out before enrolling in a program, or two increase a specific skill for marketability

Make a Decision:

  • Career Field – What job title(s) or job functions
  • Sector – Business, Government, or Nonprofit
  • Industry – What product, service, issue or population
  • Education – Degree, training, or simply professional development course
  • Re-evaluate – If you are unhappy or unsuccessful in the search or job, review above steps

Job Search – Presenting Yourself:

  • Resume – This is a marketing document, not just a factual document. For those re-inventing, a skills-based or functional resume may work better than a chronological
  • Cover Letters – Yes, I still say to use them as a way to stand out even if only looked at during phone and video interview stages. It is your chance to tell you career shift story.
  • Interview – Even if you have good interpersonal skills, this is about strategy. This includes the case for your career shift and countering barriers like age or lack of experience proactively.

Job Search – Strategies:

  • Networking, networking, networking – With a 50-80% success rate, this is still the top technique, yes, even remotely. Spend at least 50% of your job search time networking.
  • LinkedIn – This is just one resource for networking, but important. Plus job listings.
  • Job Listings – Of course, you want to continue to do apply here, but don’t get lost in it with all your time. Plus try to infuse networking into this beside pure non-vacancy networking.
  • Employment Agencies/Headhunters – This works more for people who are job searching in their existing field than career changers. In bad economic times, employment often comes back here first in terms of temp or contract work
  • Job Fairs – Even though it is less personal with virtual fairs and employers may primarily direct you to on-line applications, still go so you can get a name for correspondence to stand out.
  • Spotting Opportunities – Keep abreast of news in terms of companies that are growing or nonprofits that are received grants, then follow them and/or network.

I would be honored to help you in your career decision-making and/or job search

to help save you time and heartache!

Coming in Part Two of Reinventing Yourself: Skills-based Resume and Transferrable Skills Assessments

My friends at March Consulting have created a totally free online virtual event called The Ultimate Guide to College. In this 7-day summit experience that starts this Thursday, September 22, the March Consulting team will be interviewing 15 experts (including me!) in their various fields of work that will leave you with a better understanding of today’s current college landscape, and a career beyond! Please forward this email to friends and family who may benefit.

Topics include: College Admissions, STEM, testing, financial aid, performing arts, athletics, and careers.

Be sure to watch my interview on September 28th, where I will be discussing how to make good educational and career decisions saving time, money and heartache.  Your future is in your hands! I give a shout out to all levels of education, including apprenticeships!

This summit is an excellent opportunity for a wide range of students (and parents) to be exposed to different options for their future in an informative, fun, casual, and distanced environment. I so encourage anyone wanting to catch up with what I’m doing, or even just what these trends are looking like currently to check it out!

It is FREE OF CHARGE, (all you have to do is register here): https://www.theultimateguidetocollege.com/

Check out this amazing new program, innovatively created for pandemic times!

Karen

I wrote an article early in the pandemic about suggestions on how to take action even when you think there isn’t much you can do during difficult economic times. I was pleased to present a mini-program about this at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Career Expo on August 20. Whether you are unemployed or simply unhappy in your current role, this high-energy video with props will give you some ideas.

The first half is the program and the second half is a practical Q & A. For a (slightly less fun) reading version of the program, click here for my earlier blog post.

I’ve been invited to be the featured program presenter for another Post-Gazette Career Expo:

Reinventing Yourself during Pandemic Times

Thursday, October 22, 11:00 – 11:15 AM

This will be relevant to both unemployed folks whose industries were impacted by the pandemic job market and employed folks who are considering a career change due to pandemic re-evaluation.

I wait and wonder

               For those who are furloughed

               Will I go back? Should I look?

               How I ache for the familiar that I took for granted

               Even the parts I hated.

I wait and wonder

               For those whose jobs may be insecure

               Am I next?

               In the meantime, I feel guilty as a survivor

               Even if I don’t like my job.

I wait and wonder

               For those whose jobs have ended

               What can I find in these turbulent times?

               I’m not sure where I fit and what to do.

               Even if I’m motivated.

I wait and wonder

               For those who have been unhappy

               How can I change now?

               Maybe I better just hang on

               Even if I’m beyond ready.

I wait and wonder

               For those who are happily employed.

               How can I process this turmoil?

               I feel privileged as well as overworked

               Even as I feel grateful.       

I wait and wonder

               For those essential workers on the front line

               How long can I do this?

               It is taking its toll

               Even as I know it is important work.

I wait and wonder

               For those who own small businesses

               Will I need to close my doors?

               I can’t bear to face lost dreams and lost faces

               Even if I worked more than I wanted.

I wait and wonder

               For those working at home with children

               How can I do justice to both jobs?

               I feel like I’m not doing enough

               Even when I’m doing my best.

May you rise up to self-awareness and self-care.

May you rise up to learning and loving.

May you rise up to hope and help.

May you rise up to compassion and courage.

               You are not alone.

©2020, Karen Litzinger, Pittsburgh, PA. May be reproduced with this entire by-line. Contact: Litzinger Career Consulting, Karen@KarensCareerCoaching.com, 412-977-4029.

Register and Research:

  • Register early to have the greatest access to materials.
  • Research whether it is on-line written chat or video chat.
  • Research employers, identify your top 5, take notes to use in interactions.

Technology Tips:

  • Review any written or video tips about the platform and event.
  • Test your technology equipment.
  • If video fair, have a clean, non-distracting background, computer camera at eye level height (use books to raise as needed), and screen arranged so you are centered on the video from shoulder to head.
  • Log-on early to explore the logistics and ask for help as needed.
  • During the event, review any additional event or employer chat rooms for up-to-date information and so you are not asking a question that has already been answered. Show your attentiveness by referring to what has been written.

Prepare and Practice:

  • Prepare your “elevator pitch” including one sentence tailored to that employer demonstrating your research.
  • For written chat room fairs, prepare your pitch in advance so it is thought out and easy to cut and paste. You may prepare some template or individualized follow-up questions or closing as well, tailoring to the conversation.
  • Review typical questions you may be asked and prepared bulleted answers including examples, stories and results. Prepare questions to ask that demonstrate your knowledge of the organization.
  • If video, practice with a friend, in a mirror, or through Zoom recording option. You could post a few key points at the top of your computer or behind it.
  • Decide in advance who you want to connect with. Start with an employer of less interest and end with your top employer.

Professional Presentation:

  • In written chats, use correct grammar and capitalization.
  • For video, fully dress as if it is an in-person fair. Have a few inches visible to show professional dress
  • For video fairs, make sure to smile and periodically look directly at the camera. Arrange your screen so that the employer is centered and as close to the camera as possible.
  • Be patient and courteous with recruiters who may be fairly new at this too. Demonstrate your professionalism with statements of understanding.
  • If networking rather than job searching, share this and be respectful of time.
  • Ask for contact information, next steps, and time-frame. Consider asking for an interview.

Follow-up:

  • Send a thank you note (email is fine, hard copy can stand out) within 24-48 hours.
  • Follow any instructions given by the employer, such as applying on-line.
  • If you have contact information, follow-up a week after the fair or a few days after the timeframe the employer gave you re-expressing your interest, giving another copy of your resume, and asking about your status or interview timeframe.

More Stand Out from the Crowd Tips:

  • Reach out to your top five employers in advance whether on-line application or email so you can start your “elevator pitch” sharing your initiative.
  • Even without reaching out in advance, you could stand out by saying “You are one of my top five organizations of interest.” Then say why.
  • Connect with organizations of interest even if the vacancies are not of interest to learn about the organization culture and structure, and perhaps receive a referral to an appropriate department.
  • Circle back toward the end of the fair reminding the employer of who you are and your strong interest, again tailoring and demonstrating your knowledge of the organization.

©2020, Karen Litzinger, MA, LPC, Pittsburgh, PA. May be reproduced with permission including this full section. Litzinger Career Consulting contact information: www.KarensCareerCoaching.com, Karen@karenscareercoaching.com, 412-977-4029.

“The 6-year graduation rate for first-time, full-time undergraduate students who began seeking a bachelor’s degree at 4-year degree-granting institutions in fall 2011 overall was 60 percent.”

People are often surprised by this data from a 2019 Department of Education report. I hope this information motivates high school students and their parents to think even more carefully about post-high school choices.

This summer may be an opportune time for high school (and college) students to engage in some reflection and exploration about education and career choices. My guess is that there are less opportunities for summer jobs because of the pandemic business slow down, so possibly more time for other activities. Even if not, students have more time now than during the school year for education and career counseling. I’d be happy to help with my four session High School Advising Package. Maybe a graduation gift for someone you care about? I’m now serving clients remotely across the country.

Besides the low 60% graduation rate, think about the debt of the 40% who didn’t graduate and have thousands of dollars of loans. Average student debt of those graduating with a bachelor’s degree in 2019 was $29,900; some sources note higher rates. Loans were taken out by 69% of students. Click here for a link to the article that was updated in January 2020.

I was at a program this week by Steve Wize of Mental Fitness who shared data that 40% of college graduates are underemployed. While historically higher degrees indicate higher earnings, this could be shifting. Click here for the 2020 data on wages by education; note that the research is based on those 25 and over. There are many paths to success that do not require a bachelor’s degree. I shared options in the blog I wrote earlier this year, Top Careers that Do Not Require a Bachelor’s Degree. While there are many paths to success and happiness, I highly advocate some type of education beyond high school, whether a degree, apprenticeship, or certification.